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Mark T. Stern
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4326 E Tradewinds Ave, Lauderdale-by-the-Sea, FL 33308, USA

Practice Areas : Personal Injury Attorney

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Dwayne E. Clark, Sr. (Cowboy)
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11334 Bridges Road, Jacksonville FL 32218

Practice Areas : Alternative Dispute Resolution

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Deborah Beylus Mediator
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301 Yamato Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431, USA

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Carolann Mazza
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Stewart C Hudson
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4070 Sandy Bluff Dr W Gulf Breeze FL 32563, US

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Stewart Hudson Family Mediation

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What Happens If One Parent Refuses Mediation
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What Happens If One Parent Refuses Mediation

What Happens If One Parent Refuses Mediation? Parents going through a divorce will often attend mediation. It’s a process where parents meet with a mediator who helps them work through any issues and devise a plan for child custody and support. What happens if one parent refuses to participate in mediation? Can they still get their way? Let's take a look. Mandatory mediation in child custody cases In any divorce or child custody case, the child's interests should always be the top priority. Unfortunately, when parents cannot agree on a custody arrangement, the court system can be a harsh and adversarial environment. To help prevent children from being caught in the middle of their parents' dispute, many states now require mandatory mediation in child custody cases. It’s a process in which both parties meet with a neutral 3rd party, which helps them to discuss their differences and reach a compromise. This can often be a more effective and less stressful solution than going to court, and it allows parents to maintain some control over the outcome of their case. What are acceptable reasons for parents to refuse mediation? Mediation is a voluntary process, meaning both parties must agree to participate. If one parent refuses to mediate, the other parent can file a motion with the court asking the judge to order mediation. There are some acceptable reasons for parents to refuse mediation. For instance, if the parents feel that mediation will not be beneficial or that they cannot come to an agreement through mediation, then refusal may be warranted. Additionally, if the parents feel that the other parent is unwilling to compromise or act in the best interests of the child, then those may also be grounds for refusal. Consequences However, there are some consequences for parents who refuse to mediate. The first consequence is that it may delay the divorce or child custody case. If both parties cannot agree on a parenting plan, then the judge will have to decide based on what he or she believes is in the child's best interests. This can take weeks or even months, which can be difficult for families already going through a lot of stress and upheaval. Another consequence of refusing to mediate is that legal fees may cost more. If both parties cannot agree on a parenting plan and have to go to court, they will have to pay their attorneys to represent them before a judge. This can be expensive, especially if the case lasts long. Additionally, if one parent refuses to mediate and the other has to file a motion with the court, there will be additional court costs. Finally, refusing to mediate can damage relationships between parents and their children. If both parties cannot agree on a parenting plan and have to go to court, they will likely have to testify against each other. This can lead to hard feelings and resentment that could last for years. Additionally, a long and bitter court battle can be very stressful for children and damage their relationship with both parents. What happens if I don't want to go to mediation? If you and the other party have been ordered to attend any mediation by the court and do not want to go, there may be consequences. For example, the court could find that you are in contempt of court and impose sanctions. Additionally, if you do not participate in good faith, the mediator can report this to the court, which could also result in sanctions. In some cases, the court may order that the case proceeds to trial if it finds that mediation is not likely to be productive. Ultimately, whether or not to attend any mediation is up to you, but it is important to be aware of the potential consequences of your decision. Can the court tell us to go back to mediation? The court can order the parties to return to mediation if it finds it beneficial. For example, if the parties have made some progress in mediation but have not reached a final agreement, the court may order them to return for another session or two. Do I have to attend any mediation? It's not mandatory to attend the mediation, but if you have been ordered to by the court, you must go. If you refuse to go, there may be consequences, such as being found in contempt of court or having the case proceed to trial. What are the exemptions to attending mediation? The only time you would be exempt from attending mediation is if there is a court order stating that you do not have to attend. You must attend the sessions if you do not have a court order exempting you from mediation. Can I be forced to attend the mediation? If you have been ordered by the court to attend a mediation, then you must go. If you do not attend, you may be found in contempt of court, or the case may proceed to trial. What is the difference between mandatory and voluntary mediation? The difference between mandatory and voluntary mediation is that mandatory mediation is ordered by the court, while voluntary mediation is not. Refusal depends on the type of mediation. In mandatory mediation, both parties must attend the session. The court may find one party in contempt for refusing to attend. In voluntary mediation, either party can choose not to attend. There are no consequences for refusing to attend voluntary mediation. What is the difference between joint and separate sessions? The difference between joint and separate sessions is that, in joint sessions, both parties are in the same room with the mediator, while in separate sessions, each party is in a different room. Joint sessions are more common, allowing for open communication between the parties. Separate sessions may be used if there is a risk of violence or if one party is not cooperating. What should I expect from the first mediation session? The first mediation session is usually an opportunity for the mediator to meet with both parties and assess the situation. The mediator will likely explain the process and ground rules for mediation. Both parties will also be able to express their concerns and goals for the mediation process. What are some common ground rules for mediation? Some common ground rules for mediation include confidentiality, respect, and no interruptions. These ground rules ensure that both parties feel safe to express their concerns openly and that the mediation process is as effective as possible. FAQs on What Happens If One Parent Refuses Mediation? What happens if my ex doesn't agree to mediation? You can still attend the sessions if your ex does not agree to mediation. Your ex may be found in contempt of court if he or she refuses to attend mandatory mediation. Is mediation mandatory in South Carolina? No, mediation is not mandatory in South Carolina. However, the court may order the parties to return to mediation if it finds it beneficial. Is mediation mandatory in Florida? Yes, mediation is mandatory in Florida if the parties have minor children. Final Verdict: What Happens If One Parent Refuses Mediation? If one parent refuses to attend any mediation, there may be consequences, such as being found in contempt of court or having the case proceed to trial. However, suppose both parties attend joint sessions. In that case, the mediator will likely explain the process and ground rules for mediation, and each party will have a chance to express their concerns and goals for the mediation process. This is just an overview of what happens if one parent refuses mediation; please consult an attorney for more information.
What Is Peer Mediation
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What Is Peer Mediation

What is Peer Mediation? Everything You Need To Know Did you know that you can resolve conflicts without resorting to violence? It's called peer mediation. The Peer mediation process is an increasingly popular way to handle disputes, especially in schools. That's because it teaches conflict-resolution skills that can last a lifetime. It also gets results: Studies have shown that meditation can reduce the incidence of fighting and improve academic performance. So, what is peer mediation? This blog post will walk you through everything you need to know, including the basics of mediation, the benefits of peer mediation, and how to get started. What is Peer Mediation Anyway? Peer mediation is a process where two people in conflict meet with a trained mediator to resolve their differences. The mediator helps the parties communicate effectively and understand each other's points of view. Mediation is voluntary, meaning that both parties must agree to participate. It is confidential, which means that anything said during mediation cannot be used later in court or anywhere else. And it is informal, meaning there are no evidence or procedure rules. The mediator does not take sides or make decisions for the parties. Instead, the mediator facilitates communication and helps the parties to reach their agreement. Peer mediation can resolve conflicts of all kinds, including disagreements between friends, roommates, family members, co-workers, and even strangers. It is an effective way to resolve disputes quickly and peacefully. The Benefits of Peer Mediation There are many benefits to using peer mediation to resolve conflict. Some of these benefits include: Benefit #1: Peer Mediation Teaches Important leadership Skills and Problem solving skills One of the main benefits of peer mediation is that it teaches people skills that can be used in other areas of their lives. When individuals learn how to communicate with and listen to others effectively, they are better equipped to handle conflict in all areas of their lives. In addition, when individuals learn how to resolve conflict through mediation, they can use those same skills in future conflicts at home and work. Not only does peer mediation teach important life skills, but it also provides an opportunity for people to practice those skills in a safe and controlled environment. Benefit #2: Peer Mediator Helps People Respect Others' Points of View Another benefit of peer mediation is that it helps people respect others' points of view. For mediation to be successful, both parties must be willing to listen to each other and understand where the other person is coming from. This process can help improve relationships by teaching people how to see things from another person's perspective and understand their needs and wants. In addition, by working together towards a mutually-agreeable solution, both parties can feel like they have been heard and that their needs have been taken into consideration—which can further improve the relationship.  Benefit #3: Peer Mediation Empowers People To Take Charge Of Their Own Lives And Solve Their Problems In our daily lives, we often rely on others—such as authority figures or customer service representatives—to help us solve our problems. However, this reliance can sometimes make us incapable of solving our problems or taking charge of our lives. Peer mediation empowers people by taking charge of their problems and finding solutions that work for them. This experience can help build confidence and self-efficacy—which individuals can then carry into other aspects of their lives. Benefit #4: Peer Mediation Can Quickly And Effectively Resolve Conflicts   Another great benefit of using peer mediation to resolve conflict is that it can often do so quickly and effectively—without involving authorities or going to court. When two parties can sit with a mediator and openly communicate with each other, they can often find a resolution much faster than if they were relying on someone else (such as a supervisor or judge) to make decisions for them. In addition, because both parties have agreed upon the resolution themselves, they are more likely to comply with it—further saving time and energy down the road. Benefit #5: Peer Mediation Can Build Community By Bringing People Together To Solve Problems  Finally, another benefit of using peer mediation is that it has the potential to build community by bringing people together to solve problems. When neighbors mediate disagreements between each other or when students mediate conflicts at school, it helps create a sense of community—as everyone is working together towards a common goal (i.e., resolving disagreements). Furthermore, when members of a community mediate conflicts amongst each other rather than relying on outside sources (such as law enforcement), it helps build trust within the community—as individuals feel like they can rely on each other rather than feeling like they need an outside source (such as the police)to keep them safe. As you can see, there are many benefits associated with using peer mediation to resolve conflicts. The next time you find yourself in a disagreement with someone, consider giving peer meditation a try! Not only will you be resolving your current conflict, but you'll also be gaining valuable life skills that you can use in future conflicts. Draw Backs Of Using Peer Mediation Despite its many benefits, peer mediation is not without its drawbacks. To decide whether or not peer mediation is right for your workplace, it's important to understand some potential downsides. Potential difficulty in maintaining the confidentiality One of the key aspects of mediation is the ability to maintain confidentiality. It can be difficult to do when mediating between co-workers, as opposed to between strangers. To protect confidentiality, it's important to remind participants that what is said in mediation stays in mediation. Additionally, workplace mediators should receive training on how to maintain confidentiality. The potential for conflict between the mediator and participants When co-workers mediate a dispute, there is always the potential for conflict between the mediator and participants. To avoid this, mediators must remain impartial and objective at all times. Mediators should also receive training on handling conflict between themselves and participants. The potential for bias Another drawback of peer mediation is the potential for bias. When co-workers mediate a dispute, they may be biased towards one party. To avoid this, mediators must remain impartial and objective at all times. Mediators should also receive training on how to avoid bias. How Does the Peer Mediation Work? The steps in peer mediation will vary depending on the mediator, the situation, and the people involved. However, some general steps are often followed: The mediator meets with each person involved in the conflict individually. It allows each person to share their side of the story and express what they hope to achieve through mediation without being influenced by the other party. The mediator brings the parties together for a joint meeting. It is an opportunity for both sides to share their perspectives and begin to understand where the other is coming from. Once both sides have been heard, the mediator helps the parties brainstorm possible solutions to the problem. All solutions should be considerate of both parties' needs and wants. It means that a resolution is not possible unless both parties agree to it. The parties decide on a resolution they are both satisfied with and commit to following through with it. Both parties must agree to the resolution and feel they have been heard before making any decisions. The mediator follows up with both parties after some time has passed to ensure that the resolution is still being followed and that there are no new problems or issues. This allows any bumps in the road to be addressed early on so that further conflicts can be avoided. FAQs About What is Peer Mediation? Who can be a mediator? Anyone can be a mediator as long as they have received training in mediation skills. Peer Mediators typically come from diverse backgrounds, including educators, counselors, social workers, and community leaders. How do I get started with peer mediation? If you are interested in starting a peer mediation program, many resources are available to help you get started. Conclusion: What is Peer Mediation? Peer mediation is a process where two people in conflict talk to each other with the help of a trained mediator. The mediator's job is to facilitate communication and help the parties involved come to a resolution. Peer mediation has many benefits, including teaching people important skills, resolving conflicts quickly, and building community spirit. Consider using peer mediation to solve the problem if you have a conflict with someone.
Understanding Your Contractual Dispute Resolution Options
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Understanding Your Contractual Dispute Resolution Options

Understanding Your Contractual Dispute Resolution Options When two parties cannot agree on the terms of a contract, it may be necessary to involve a third party to resolve this. This third party can take on many forms, but its ultimate goal is to help the disagreeing parties reach an acceptable agreement with both. Various dispute resolution options are available depending on the severity of the disagreement and the relationship between the parties. Why are Businesses Not Going To Court For Their Contractual Dispute Resolution? Many reasons businesses are not going to court for their contractual dispute resolution. The high cost of litigation The high cost of litigation is one of the primary reasons businesses are not going to court for their contractual dispute resolution. Litigation can be extremely expensive, and businesses often do not have the resources to cover the costs. In addition, the legal process can be time consuming, taking away from other important business activities. The risk of losing the case Another reason businesses are not going to court for their contractual dispute resolution is the risk of losing the case. If a business does not have a strong legal case, it may be ordered to pay the other party's legal fees, which can be significant. In addition, a business may be forced to make concessions to settle the case out of court. The possibility of a lengthy trial Another reason businesses are not going to court for their contractual dispute resolution is the possibility of a lengthy trial. Trials can take months or even years to resolve, and businesses often do not have the time or resources to dedicate to such a long process. In addition, there is always the possibility that a trial will not result in a favorable outcome for the business. The negative publicity associated with litigation Another reason why businesses are not going to court for their contractual dispute resolution is the negative publicity associated with litigation. When businesses go to court, their disputes become public records, damaging their reputation. In addition, media coverage of trials can be negative and may portray the business negatively. The impact on business relationships Another reason businesses are not going to court for their contractual dispute resolution is the impact on business relationships. When businesses litigate, they often damage relationships with other businesses and individuals involved in the case. In addition, litigation can make it difficult for businesses to resolve future disputes amicably. Top Methods Used Nowadays For Alternative Dispute Resolution There are a lot of dispute resolution methods that you can use. These dispute resolution processes can have pros and cons but are worth considering as a business dispute resolution process. Arbitration Arbitration is an alternative dispute resolution ADR process whereby a neutral third party, known as an arbitrator, hears both sides of the dispute and then renders a binding decision. Unlike mediation or negotiation, the arbitrator can impose a resolution on the parties in the arbitration process. Arbitration is often used when the parties do not want to go to court or wish to keep the dispute confidential. Mediation Mediation is a conflict resolution process whereby a mediator helps the parties resolve contract disputes more quickly than other methods.. The mediator does not have the authority to impose a solution but rather facilitates communication between the parties to help them reach an agreement. Mediation is often used as an alternative to litigation because it is typically less expensive and quicker. In addition, mediation can be used at any stage of litigation, whereas arbitration generally must be agreed upon before litigation begins. Negotiation Negotiation is a process whereby the parties communicate directly to reach an agreement. Negotiation can take place at any time during or after litigation has begun. Unlike mediation and arbitration, negotiation does not require using a third party. Rather, it allows the parties to work together directly to resolve their differences. There are also other methods approved, such as ENE, that help resolve problems between the disputing parties. How To Resolve Contractual Disputes By Yourself? Resolving disputes Without Anyone! There are a few methods you can use to try to resolve contractual disputes by yourself without going to court or using a third-party mediator. One method is simply talking to the other party involved in the dispute. This can be done in person, over the phone, or through email or another written communication. You may be able to agree simply by communicating with the other party and explaining your position. Another method you can use to resolve contractual disputes by yourself is to try the above processes we've already discussed. Whether in the construction industry or other industries, you can use these ADR methods to help you In any case. Still, Filing a Lawsuit? How To Do It? If you've tried the methods above and could not reach an agreement, you may need to file a lawsuit. Filing a lawsuit is a complex process, so it's important to understand the steps involved before getting started. The first step in filing a lawsuit is determining which court has jurisdiction over your case. Jurisdiction is the power of a court to hear and decide a case. There are three types of jurisdiction: Subject matter jurisdiction This type of jurisdiction gives a court the power to hear certain cases. For example, federal courts have subject matter jurisdiction over cases involving federal law. Personal jurisdiction This jurisdiction allows a court to hear cases involving certain people or businesses. For example, a court in New York would have personal jurisdiction over a New York resident being sued for breach of contract. Venue This type of jurisdiction determines where a case will be heard. For example, if you live in New York and are suing a New York resident for breach of contract, you would file your case in a New York court. Once you've determined which court has jurisdiction over your case, you'll need to file a complaint. Filing a Complaint A complaint is a document that lays out the facts of your case and explains why you're suing. After filing your complaint, the court will issue a summons. A summons is a document that requires the person you're suing (the defendant) to appear in court and answer your complaint. If the defendant does not appear in court, the court may enter a default judgment against them. A default judgment is a ruling in your favor because the defendant failed to attend court. Once the defendant has been served with a summons and complaint, they will have time to file an answer. An answer is a document in which the defendant responds to your complaint. The defendant may admit, deny, or argue against the claims you've made in your complaint. After the defendant has filed an answer, the discovery process will begin. Discovery is the process of gathering evidence. Both sides will have the opportunity to request documents and take depositions. A deposition is a sworn statement given by a witness. After discovery is complete, both sides will have the opportunity to file motions. Motions are requests made to the court. For example, a motion to dismiss requests the court to dismiss the case because there is no evidence to support it. If either side files a motion, there will be a hearing in front of a judge. The judge will decide whether to grant or deny the motion. If the judge denies the motion, the case will proceed to trial. If the judge grants the motion, the case may be dismissed, or the judge may make a ruling on the case's merits. The trial is the final stage of litigation. Both sides will present their evidence and argument to a jury at trial. The jury will then deliberate and reach a verdict. If the jury finds it in your favor, the court will enter a judgment against the defendant for the damages you requested. If the jury does not find it in your favor, the case will be over, and the defendant will not be required to pay any damages. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) What is a contractual dispute? A contractual dispute is a disagreement between two parties over the terms of a contract. This can include disagreements over the price, quality, or delivery of goods or services. What are some common ways to resolve a contractual dispute? Common ways to resolve a contractual dispute include arbitration, mediation, and negotiation. Conclusion: Understanding Your Contractual Dispute Resolution Options When two parties cannot agree on the terms of a contract, it may be necessary to involve a third party to resolve this. Depending on the severity of the disagreement and the relationship between the parties, various dispute resolution options are available, including arbitration, mediation, and negotiation. Understanding your options can help you choose the best course of action for your particular situation.

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