100

YRS

of matching people to attorneys

98

%

lawyers listed are verified

10

M

monthly visit our network

100

+

practice areas covered.

Featured Mediators

Popular Exclusive Listings In Our Directory
Dwayne E. Clark, Sr. (Cowboy)
Ad

Be the first one to rate!

11334 Bridges Road, Jacksonville FL 32218

Practice Areas : Alternative Dispute Resolution

Hosana Consultant, LLC
Deborah Beylus Mediator
Ad

Be the first one to rate!

301 Yamato Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431, USA

Practice Areas : Divorce Mediation

Stewart C Hudson
Ad

Be the first one to rate!

4070 Sandy Bluff Dr W Gulf Breeze FL 32563, US

Practice Areas : Family Mediation

Stewart Hudson Family Mediation
Carolann Mazza
Ad

5.0

2 SE 7th Street 704 Fort Lauderdale FL 33301, US

Practice Areas : Collaborative Law Attorney

We keep families out of court
Mark T. Stern
Ad

Be the first one to rate!

4326 E Tradewinds Ave, Lauderdale-by-the-Sea, FL 33308, USA

Practice Areas : Personal Injury Attorney

Law Offices of Mark T. Stern

We promote the highest level of mediation skills among our members.

Lawsuit.com promotes mediation as a non-adversarial means of resolving all manner of disputes and increasing access to justice. Through this platform, we will advance the practice and use of mediation through education & information, innovation, and technology.

Are you a Mediator?

What’s the strangest reason a lawsuit was filed against you?

What’s the strangest reason a lawsuit was filed against you?

As a lawyer, what circumstance was brought to you (for a plaintiff or defendant) that turned out to be much more than what you imagined as the case evolved?

As a lawyer, what circumstance was brought to you (for a plaintiff or defendant) that turned out to be much more than what you imagined as the case evolved?

What is the one stand-out moment in settlement negotiations that surprised you?

What is the one stand-out moment in settlement negotiations that surprised you?

Members

Find your attorney by different types

Serving Around the Globe

Watch Actual People from worldwide are talking about our firm

noahparker.us7
johnparkerwillis81
aboasr45
hyacinthgolden4
jimboost4467
melbag36
bluelinespas32
smalky71956
hen40411

From Our Blogs

See Services In These Cities
Website accessibility lawsuits are alive and well under the ADA
admin

Website accessibility lawsuits are alive and well under the ADA

Website accessibility lawsuits are on the rise. Despite society's continued advancements, many businesses and organizations have yet to comply with the requirements of the ADA, leading to an increasing number of website accessibility lawsuits. While these suits can be costly and time-consuming to defend, they are also a reminder that all businesses must ensure their websites are accessible to everyone. Let's take a closer look at why website accessibility is so important and what you can do to ensure your site is compliant. What’s the ADA? The Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA, was passed in 1990 and prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities in all areas of public life, including workplaces, schools, transportation, and government buildings. The law also requires that businesses and other organizations take steps to ensure that people with disabilities have equal access to their services and facilities. In the years since the ADA was passed, it has also been interpreted to include websites. This means that all public-facing websites must be accessible to people with disabilities. This includes features such as text that can be resized without losing content, alt text for images, and transcripts for audio and video content. Making a website accessible benefits people with disabilities and makes it more user-friendly for everyone. By complying with the ADA’s standards, businesses can ensure that their websites are accessible to the widest possible audience. Who does the ADA protect? The ADA protects people with a wide range of disabilities, including those who have: Visual ImpairmentsHearing ImpairmentsPhysical DisabilitiesCognitive DisabilitiesAnd More To be protected by the ADA, a person must have a disability that limits their ability to participate in one or more major life activities. This can include walking, talking, breathing, caring for oneself, and working. Additionally, a person must have a record of such a disability or be regarded as having such a disability. Thus, anyone who wants to make an accessible website that is also very good in assistive technology must follow all these guidelines. What are the penalties for non-compliance? The penalties for violating the ADA’s accessibility requirements can be significant. Businesses that are found to violate the ADA can be required to pay damages to the complainant, as well as their attorney’s fees. In some cases, businesses may also be required to change their website or take other measures to ensure compliance. What can you do to make sure your website is accessible? You can take several steps to ensure your website is accessible to everyone. The web content accessibility guidelines (online accessibility act) include: Use Clear And Concise LanguageAvoiding Too Much JargonUse Easy To Read Font SizesProviding Alt Text For All ImagesEnsuring Audio And Video Content Is CaptionedAnd More Making your website accessible doesn’t have to be complicated or time-consuming. By taking a few simple steps, you can ensure that your site is compliant with the ADA and accessible to everyone. The ADA also applies to mobile apps, and these website accessibility laws will also catch those who don' comply with mobile app accessibility guidelines. Hence, ADA lawsuits and website accessibility laws are crucial when making a new website. Does this mean websites have to be 100% accessible? The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) applies to digital spaces, requiring that websites and other online content be accessible to people with vision, hearing, and mobility impairments. However, the law does not mandate that all websites be 100% accessible. Rather, website owners must make a good faith effort to ensure that their sites are accessible to as many people as possible. As long as website owners are taking steps to improve accessibility, they generally comply with the ADA. Unless and until the DOJ sets forth clear guidance on what makes a website accessible or not, courts will have no choice but to review each case on the facts presented The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) has been increasingly applied to websites, with the courts holding that sites that are not accessible to individuals with disabilities are discriminating against them in violation of the law. However, the Department of Justice (DOJ), which is responsible for enforcing the ADA, has yet to issue any clear guidance on what makes a website accessible or not. As a result, courts have had to evaluate each case on its own merits, resulting in a patchwork of inconsistent decisions. Until the DOJ provides clear guidance on this issue, courts will struggle to reach a uniform standard. This lack of clarity is bad for businesses and individuals with disabilities and creates a risk of costly litigation. What does the Department of Justice say about web compliance with the ADA? Earlier this year, the U.S DOJ has released guidance on web accessibility and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The guidance provides covered entities with flexibility in compliance while highlighting common barriers and potential solutions. The DOJ's guidance is divided into three sections: an overview of the ADA, a discussion of common web accessibility issues, and suggested solutions for covered entities. In the overview section, the DOJ emphasizes that the ADA applies to all aspects of daily life, including activities that take place online. The guidance then discusses some of the most common accessibility issues covered entities may encounter when developing or maintaining their websites. These include insufficient color contrast, lack of text alternatives for non-text content, and insufficient captioning for video content. Finally, the guidance provides suggested solutions for each of these issues. For example, the DOJ suggests that covered entities use contrasting colors for text and background colors, provide text alternatives for non-text content, and ensure that all videos are properly captioned. Recently, there has been an uptick in web accessibility lawsuits that are filed in courts around the US The lawsuit for accessibility issues increased by 14% from 2020 to 2021. There were 372 more cases registered in 2021, and the total number was up to 2895. Comparing it to 2017 and 2018 data would imply that a 177% increase in these types of lawsuits has happened to date. It’s a major concern among people with disabilities who want to use the internet for good. Several factors may be driving this trend. First, the pandemic has forced more people with disabilities to rely on online tools and resources, magnifying the importance of website accessibility. Second, the Department of Justice has clarified that it intends to enforce the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) more aggressively, particularly regarding website accessibility. Finally, plaintiffs’ attorneys have become savvier about using technology to identify potential defendants and have developed creative litigation strategies proving effective in court. Whatever the reasons for the recent increases, one thing is certain: website accessibility litigation is here to stay. And with the DOJ's new guidance, businesses and other covered entities should expect even more lawsuits in the years to come. More than half of the recent web accessibility cases have been against private companies Over the past few years, there has been an increase in the number of web accessibility lawsuits filed in the United States. More than half of these cases have been against private companies. While the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) does not mention web accessibility, the Department of Justice states that the ADA applies to websites. Private companies must ensure that their websites are accessible to people with disabilities. These websites must be designed and maintained to allow people with disabilities to use them. This includes ensuring the website can be used with assistive technologies like screen readers. The famous companies that were found not to comply with the ADA are: 1. Amazon: In 2017, the National Federation of the Blind filed a lawsuit against Amazon, alleging that the online retailer's website was not accessible to blind users. The case is still pending. 2. eBay: In 2016, a federal court ruled that eBay's website was not accessible to blind users. The company has since made some changes to its website to improve accessibility. 3. Netflix: In 2016, the National Association of the Deaf filed a lawsuit against Netflix, alleging that the streaming service's website and app were not accessible to deaf users. The case is still pending. 4. Target: In 2015, the National Federation of the Blind filed a lawsuit against Target, alleging that the retailer's website was not accessible to blind users. Target has since made some changes to its website to improve accessibility. 5. Toys "R" Us: In 2016, a federal court ruled that Toys "R" Us' website was not accessible to blind users. The company has since made some changes to its website to improve accessibility. While the Americans with Disabilities Act applies to all websites, a few exceptions exist. The law does not apply to websites that are not publicly accessible, such as those behind a paywall or require a login. In addition, the law does not apply to government websites. However, many state and local governments have laws requiring government websites to be accessible. A recent study found that over a quarter of top retail websites surveyed were not compliant with web accessibility guidelines According to a recent study, none of the world’s top 50 websites comply with digital accessibility guidelines. This is troubling, considering that more than one billion people, or 15% of the world’s population, report some form of disability that impacts their ability to navigate a website. The most common accessibility issues include problems with color contrast, text size, and keyboard navigation. These issues can make it difficult or impossible for people with certain disabilities to use a website. In some cases, these accessibility issues can also impact people without disabilities, such as those trying to use a website on a mobile phone. The good news is that many tools and resources are available to help website owners make their sites more accessible. By taking the time to learn about digital accessibility and implementing some simple changes, we can make the web a more inclusive place for everyone. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Does my website need to comply with the ADA? Yes, if your website is publicly accessible and you are a private company. What does it mean to be ADA compliant on a website? It means that your website must be accessible to people with disabilities. This includes ensuring the website can be used with assistive technologies like screen readers. How does ADA relate to web development? The ADA relates to web development because it requires that all websites be accessible to people with disabilities. This includes ensuring the website can be used with assistive technologies like screen readers. What is Ada & WCAG Compliance? ADA compliance means that your website must be accessible to people with disabilities. WCAG compliance is a set of guidelines for making websites accessible. Takeaway: Your company can get sued for having an inaccessible website, so it is important to take steps to make sure your website complies Just as brick-and-mortar businesses must ensure their premises are accessible to people with disabilities, so must website owners take steps to ensure their sites are accessible. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prohibits discrimination based on disability, and this prohibition extends to websites. If your website is not accessible to people with disabilities, you could open your company up to a lawsuit. While it may seem like a daunting task to make your website compliant with the ADA, there are some simple steps you can take to get started. For example, you can add alt text to images so that people who are blind or have low vision can understand what is depicted. You can also provide transcripts for videos and audio content. These measures will help ensure that your website is accessible to everyone, regardless of disability.
Types of Mediation: Evaluative, Facilitative, and Transformative
admin

Types of Mediation: Evaluative, Facilitative, and Transformative

Did you know that the percentage of people who wants mediation in the USA every year is around 70%? This number is quite high, and it shows that many people feel the need for an impartial third party when it comes to resolving disputes. Different people require different types of mediation. However, the three most common types of mediation are there, and in this blog post, we will discuss them in detail. So, let's start the article without wasting any time. Why is Mediation Necessary? Purpose of Mediation The main purpose of mediation is to help people resolve their differences amicably. It also requires both parties to communicate with each other openly and honestly. Apart from this, mediation also teaches people how to compromise and negotiate. Let's take an example, Suppose you are a company manager, and one of your employees has filed a sexual harassment complaint against another employee. In such a scenario, you can't just ignore the issue and hope it will disappear. You have to take some action. One option is to investigate and then take disciplinary action against the accused employee. But what if the accused employee denies the allegations? And even if he is found guilty, will that be enough to resolve the issue? Probably not! The victim employee may feel unsafe in the workplace and not trust her co-workers anymore. In such a scenario, mediation can be really helpful. Mediation can help the victim and the accused employee to communicate with each other directly. It will also help them understand each other's perspectives and find an acceptable resolution. Hence, we can say that mediation is a process that can help people resolve their differences peacefully and amicably. 5 Steps Of Mediations Explained In Detail You might be wondering how the mediation process works. Well, it generally involves five steps, which are as follows: 1. Intake and Screening: This is the first step of mediation, and in this step, a mediator meets with both parties to get an overview of the situation. The mediator also tries to determine if mediation is the right option for the parties involved. 2. Opening Statement: In this step, the mediator explains the mediation process to both parties and sets some ground rules. He also reminds both parties of their goals for mediation. 3. Information Gathering: In this step, the mediator tries to gather information from both parties about the conflict. He also tries to identify the underlying issues that are causing the conflict. 4. Brainstorming and Solution Finding: In this step, the mediator helps both parties to brainstorm possible solutions to the problem. He also assists them in finding an agreement that is acceptable to both parties. 5. Closing: In this step, the mediator summarizes the agreement reached by both parties. He also discusses the next steps that need to be taken by both parties. With these five steps, mediation generally comes to an end. However, the process may vary slightly depending on the specific situation. Types of Mediation - Styles of Mediation Needed Today As we discussed earlier, different people require different types of mediation. However, the three most common types of mediation are evaluative, facilitative, and transformational. Let's discuss each of them in detail. Evaluative mediation Evaluative mediation is a type in which the mediator evaluates both parties and their positions. He then provides his own opinion about who is right and who is wrong. This type of mediation is generally used in cases where the parties involved are unwilling to negotiate. Evaluative mediators will help you with your common problems and are also not very expensive. Pros Evaluative mediation is generally faster than other types of mediation.It is also less expensive than other types of mediation. Cons The parties involved may not be satisfied with the mediator's opinion.The mediator may not be neutral and impartial. Facilitative mediation A facilitative mediator is another person with a better understanding than an evaluative mediator and transformative mediators. Facilitative mediators will focus on building relations with their clients by allowing them to communicate more. Hence, facilitative mediation is a type in which the mediator helps both parties to communicate with each other. He also assists them in finding a solution that is acceptable to both parties. This type of mediation is generally used in cases where the parties involved are willing to negotiate. Pros The mediator is neutral and impartial.Both parties are generally satisfied with the outcome. Cons Facilitative mediation may take longer than other types of mediation. Transformative mediation Transformative mediation is a type in which the mediator helps both parties to understand each other's perspectives. He also helps them find a solution acceptable to both parties. This type of mediation is generally used in cases where the parties involved want to improve their relationship. Pros The mediator is neutral and impartial.Both parties are generally satisfied with the outcome.Transformative mediation can help improve relationships. Cons Transformative mediation may take longer than other types of mediation. Which type of mediation is right for you and your situation? If you want to find a quick resolution to your problem, evaluative mediation may be the right option for you. However, facilitative and transformative mediation may be better if you want to improve your relationship with the other party. A transformative mediator is the best person to go for in this situation to resolve conflict by mediation training. It is important to note that each type of mediation has advantages and disadvantages. You should choose the type of mediation right for you and your specific situation. The Best Service For Your Mediations: Lawsuit.com Lawsuit.com is the best directory to find what you need if you're in dispute and looking for mediation services. You can search for mediators by location and practice area and read reviews from other users to find the right fit for your case. Once you've found a few interested mediators, you can contact them directly through the site to get started resolving your dispute quickly and easily. With Lawsuit.com, finding mediation services has never been easier. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) What is the most common type of mediation? The most common type of mediation is facilitative mediation. But the best type of mediation for you will depend on your situation. Like, the transformative approach is great for people with trust issues. What is the difference between mediation and arbitration? Mediation is a process in which a mediator helps two parties to communicate with each other and find a solution that is acceptable to both parties. Arbitration is when an arbitrator hears both sides of a dispute and makes a decision binding on both parties. What are the six techniques for mediation? There are six common techniques for mediation: evaluation, facilitation, transformative, arbitration, negotiation, and settlement planning. What is an example of mediation in the workplace? An example of mediation in the workplace is when an employee has a dispute with their employer. The mediator will help the two parties communicate with each other and find a resolution that is acceptable to both parties. What is the advantage of mediation over a court hearing? The advantage of mediation is that it is often quicker and cheaper than a court hearing. Mediation also allows the parties more control over their dispute's outcome. What are the disadvantages of mediation? The disadvantages of mediation are that it may take longer than other types of dispute resolution, and both parties must be willing to negotiate. The Bottom Line Mediation is a process in which a mediator helps two parties to communicate with each other and find a solution that is acceptable to both parties. Mediation has many advantages, including being faster and cheaper than a court hearing. But it also has some disadvantages, such as taking longer than other types of dispute resolution. You should choose the type of mediation right for you and your specific situation. You will get the best facilitative and evaluative legal expertise service for your ongoing relationship here from Lawsuit.com, which is great. You will never regret using their services!
Introducing Articles of Amendment by L4SB

Introducing Articles of Amendment by L4SB

Law 4 Small Business is proud to announce our new service offering: Articles of Amendment The research has been completed, the forms generated, and the service is now ready to...

Featured in

How to use Lawsuit.com Website

Find Mediators and Arbitrators

Choose from a wide range of categories to narrow your search

Write a review

Share your experience and help the Lawsuit.com community select the best professional for your mediation or arbitration

Make a Listing

Join the ADR Professionals to grow and expand your reach online. Create a listing today

WORK WITH LAWSUIT.COM?

Are you an Mediator, arbitrator or lawyer?
Get Listing in our Directory, plus other perks and rewards,
BECOME A MEMBER